The five best guitar teachers on YouTube (Guitar Lessons)

ouTube is a fantastic resource for guitar lessons. Not only are there dozens of highly-skilled guitar players demonstrating chords, lick, styles and songs. But some of the world’s best, and most well-known guitar players, some of them sadly no longer with us, are right there giving lessons.

So I thought that it would be great to put together a kind of video notebook of some of the best lessons I could find on there and keep it so that when I get some time (ha!) I can watch the videos and learn a few new tricks.

And if I’m building a list of great videos for myself, seems kinda logical that I should share it here. So, here are my five favourite all-star guitar lessons from some of the best players ever to pick-up an axe.

Stevie Ray Vaughan

The late, great Texas bluesman talks in detail about the blue that influenced him and the differences in style between the Chicago blues he grew up listening to and the British blues bands of the Sixties.

Eric Clapton

A long-haired, moustached Slowhand, filmed in the late sixties, talks about how he gets those amazing tones, and how he used the Wah Wah to such great effect. Playing a rather funky SG, too.

Slash

The leery grinned one explains how to play Velvet Revolver’s American Man.

Angus Young

Angus the legend unlocks the secrets of those classic AC/DC riffs.

Andy Summers

Has to be filed under dull, but worthy, this one. A pretty disinterested Andy Summers demonstrates some Police riffs while making it clear that that’s not what he does anymore.

 

The Epiphone Les Paul – How The Very First One Was Built

f there’s a single electric guitar range that’s synonymous with Epiphone , and in particular its Gibson copies, it’s the Les Paul. Epiphone currently lists 19 Les Paul guitars in its line-up, including legends like the Les Paul Custom, Les Paul Studio, and the Les Paul Junior.

While it’s widely assumed that Les Paul designed the original guitar which bore his name for Gibson and that Epiphone later made less expensive versions from factories in Korea and Japan, this only scratches the surface of the real, much more interesting, story.

Paul started building what eventually became the Gibson Les Paul in 1941, using Epiphone parts and facilities in Epiphone’s New York factory. The Log, as Paul nicknamed that first guitar was made by attaching an Epiphone neck, fingerboard and body parts to a 4in by 4in board. Les Paul then took a couple of body halves from an Epiphone and attached them either side of a centre block.

Sometime later, while he was in Chicago, Paul took The Log to the Chicago Musical Instruments Company, which owned Gibson. He was politely, but firmly, shown the door. The words of CMI’s president, MH Berlin, who described The Log as a ‘broomstick with pick-ups’, must have stung, but they didn’t discourage him from designing and building guitars. Eventually he managed to attract Gibson’s interest and in 1952, the first Les Paul solid body electric guitar was produced, and the rest, is history.

The Gibson Les Paul, in its many and various models, has become arguably the most recognised electric guitar shape on the planet. Only Fender’s Stratocaster comes close. Almost every great rock and blues guitar player has owned and played at least one. And even guitarists like Eric Clapton who later became identified with other makes and models, played some of their best riffs on a Les Paul.

And of course, the Les Paul was introduced to a whole new set of fans when it was used as the basis for the controller in the video game, Guitar Hero III.